Lifestream Advanced Digestive Enzymes provides good levels of a broad combination of digestive enzymes necessary to assist digestive processes throughout the digestive tract. It contains a proprietary blend of plant and microbial derived enzymes specifically designed to aid the digestion of nutrient dense meals.

This formula is designed specifically to support digestion for people who eat the typical modern diet, which is high in protein, fat, refined carbohydrates and newly raw food. It contains a proprietary blend of enzymes specifically designed to aid the digestion of these heavier meals. It does not contain HCL from ox bile which is common in some digestive enzymes making it a vegetarian friendly option.

Raw foods such as fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of enzymes, but these enzymes are destroyed when the food is processed, canned, or cooked. The modern diet consists of predominantly enzyme deficient cooked foods. Supplementation with enzymes helps to replace those lost in cooking, helps us access the nutrients from our food and enhances the enzymes found in raw foods.

Lifestream Advanced Digestive Enzymes contains a blend of proteolytic, lipolytic and carbohydrolytic enzymes to assist the digestion of protein, fat and carbohydrates.

  • Protease 4.5 is a mixture of proteases that work synergistically with endogenous enzymes to provide protein digestion in the stomach and small intestine.
  • Papain and Bromelain – assist protein digestion to provide amino acids which are used to build muscles, metabolic enzymes, neurotransmitters and many other essential biochemicals.
  • Lipase has broad substrate specificity on the fats and oils of vegetable and animal origins.
  • Amylase, tilactase and cellulase are carbohydrate enzymes which assist in the digestion of starch, lactose and cellulose allowing for a more complete digestion of carbohydrates consumed. 
  • Assists optimum digestive processes throughout the digestive tract
  • Helps promote the proper digestion of fats, protein, carbohydrates, raw food, dairy
  • Improved absorption and utilisation of nutrients including vitamins such as D, A, E and K
  • Replace enzymes lost in cooking
  • Reduces Bloating and gas

KEY BENEFITS

  • A broad range of enzymes to cover multiple aspects of digestion
  • No HCL from ox bile for people sensitive stomachs
  • Vegetarian/vegan friendly
  • Small capsule, can be opened and added to food
  • People with diets high in protein, fat, carbohydrates or raw food
  • Age related digestive insufficiency - a person's ability to properly digest and absorb their food decreases at a rate of near 10% per decade
  • Food intolerances - such as lactose intolerance - implicated in numerous digestive disorders
  • Indigestion and constipation - caused by stress, overeating and eating too quickly which limits enzyme secretion.
  • People suffering from improper fat digestion - which results in malabsorption of nutrients such as vitamins A and E
  • Those looking for weight management support

Service suggestions

Adult: 1-2 capsules daily with a meal

Ingredients:

Ingredient Profile

Protease 4.5

Is a mixture of proteases that work synergistically with endogenous enzymes to provide protein digestion in the stomach and small intestine

Papain and Bromelain

Assist protein digestion to provide amino aceds which are used to build muscles, metabolic enzymes, neurotransmitters and many other essential biochemicals

Lipase

Assists breakdown of fats and oils of vegetable and animal origins

Amylase, tilactase and cellulase

Are carbohydrate enzymes which assist in the digestion of starch, lactose and cellulose allowing for a more complete digestion of carbohydrates consumed

Please note:

Wheat, dairy and soy are used on the fermentation process to feed the enzymes. While none are detected in the final product, we can not label the product as “free” of the allergens

Related Articles

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The concept of digestive enzymes is fairly easy to understand, but when delving into the details it is helpful to take a step back and understand what the myriad of available enzymes are actually performing within the body. While many separate enzymes are needed to interact with the food we eat, there are three amylase, protease, and lipase which are associated with the primary macronutrients in our diet; carbohydrates, proteins, and fats respectively.

Along with probiotics, digestive enzymes can play a role in supporting the digestive and immune systems. The foods we eat are composed of macronutrients, protein, fats, and carbohydrates. As these foods move through the digestive system, we extract macro- and micronutrients. Digestive enzymes break these down in order for our bodies to access these nutrients.

This review of the medical literature from 1994 to 2003 summarizes the relationship between raw and cooked vegetables and cancer risk and examines whether they may affect cancer risk differently. Twenty-eight studies examined the relationship between raw and cooked vegetables and risk for various cancers. Twenty-one studies assessed raw, but not cooked, vegetables and cancer risk. The majority of these assessed risk of oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal, esophageal, lung, gastric, and colorectal cancers. Most showed that vegetables, raw or cooked, were inversely related to these cancers. However, more consistent results were found for oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal, esophageal, and gastric cancers. Nine of the 11 studies of raw and cooked vegetables showed statistically significant inverse relationships of these cancers with raw vegetables, but only 4 with cooked vegetables. 

This article reviews various forms of enzyme supplementation used clinically in digestive and absorption disorders. Enzyme supplementation plays an integral role in the management of various digestive disorders, particularly with regard to exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. However, application of enzymes may also be beneficial for other conditions associated with poor digestion including lactose intolerance. Historically, porcine and bovine pancreatic enzymes have been the preferred form of supplementation for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Use of microbe-derived lipase has shown promise with studies indicating benefit similar to pancreatic enzymes, but at a lower dosage concentration and with a broader pH range.

Alterations in the bowel flora and its activities are now believed to be contributing factors to many chronic and degenerative diseases. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis have all been linked to alterations in the intestinal microflora. The intestinal dysbiosis hypothesis suggests a number of factors associated with modern Western living have a detrimental impact on the microflora of the gastrointestinal tract.